Korehira Watanabe :: Japanese master Sword Maker ▸

Watanabe-sword-maker

One question about this ping pong furniture masterpiece…how do I convince my wife that we can’t go on living with out this table?

Pingtuated Equilibripong :: Akke Functional Art (1)
Pingtuated-Equilibripong
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Sports like it should be. Full of mud, blood, sweat, tears and handlebar mustaches.

Rugby Engraving England V. Scotland :: By W.H Overend 1889
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raulowsky’s art & design makes me want to be a better something, and to howl like like a mad man.

raulowsky (1)

raulowsky (3)
raulowsky (4)
raulowsky (5)
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Drive It Day commemorates the Thousand Mile Trial which was first held on April 23 1900. Held to win over the general public, who at the time were wary of motor-cars. Laurent agreed to answer a few questions I had about him and this shoot.

Can you tell us a little bit about yourself?
I’m 38 years old, French, living in Paris. I’m an art director for the automotive French brand Citroën in the design department for 12 years. I began photography in 2006 by myself…for hobby.

Can you give us a little background on this particular shoot?
I was contacted by Gaby Von Oppenheim who imagined, organized and managed the first edition of this event to shoot it because she liked my pictures. This was very intense, because there was a lot of cars with a lot of people, so not always easy to make good shots of the cars. It’s why I’ve got a lot of close-ups and details of cars.

Drive It Day :: Laurent Nivalle (1)
Drive It Day :: Laurent Nivalle (2)

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Drive It Day :: Laurent Nivalle (3)
Drive It Day :: Laurent Nivalle (4)
Drive It Day :: Laurent Nivalle (5)
Drive It Day :: Laurent Nivalle (6)

“Most of the public had not seen a motor-car, and those who had were extremely shocked and frightened, being deeply suspicious of the explosions, noise and smell emitted by the engines, let alone the dust kicked up as these monstrosities moved at great speed amongst the horse-drawn vehicles and pedestrians.”
– thousand mile trial of 1900

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Another bike from Budnitz Bicycles. This model is made of stainless steel. Also available in black steel. Compact and nimble, this bike was built specifically for the challenges of a big city.

Budnitz Bicycles No.4 Stainless Steel (1)

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Budnitz Bicycles No.4 Stainless Steel (2)
Budnitz Bicycles No.4 Stainless Steel (3)

“I focus on owning very few things that are top quality. I discovered a while back that it actually cost me less to invest in quality products that last a very long time, and I get to enjoy more because they function well or are beautiful.”
– paul budnitz

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Maxime Pinol is a designer automobile from Chatenay Malabry, France.

Emotion-Art :: Maxime Pinol (1)
Emotion-Art :: Maxime Pinol (2)
Emotion-Art :: Maxime Pinol (3)
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What are your doing looking at a silly screen? It’s the weekend by dammit, get out in the sun and frolic with ferocity!

Milonga - A short film by Cafe Twin (1)
Milonga - A short film by Cafe Twin (2)
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Brilliant behind the scenes break-down of an infographic from Kevin Quealy at the New York Times Graphic Department.

Matt Ericson sketch 

How Mariano Rivera Compares to Baseball’s Best Closers :: chartsnthings (1)

Data scraped from Baseball Reference.com (I use this site all the time). 

How Mariano Rivera Compares to Baseball’s Best Closers :: chartsnthings (2)

The data from above turned into Adobe Illustrator 

How Mariano Rivera Compares to Baseball’s Best Closers :: chartsnthings (3)

The final print version 

How Mariano Rivera Compares to Baseball’s Best Closers :: chartsnthings

“…I had planned on spending the day doing some longer-term work in preparation for the Olympics and generally phoning it in Friday-style when a handful of us got assigned a daily – a graphic that looked back on Mariano Rivera’s career in light of his A.C.L. injury on Thursday.”
– kevin quealy

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Revealing art from Nick Veasey. I wonder, does Nick glow in the dark?

Nick Veasey :: X-Ray Photos (1)

Nick Veasey :: X-Ray Photos (2)

Nick Veasey :: X-Ray Photos (3)

Nick Veasey :: X-Ray Photos (4)
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Pat Dolan of Sportsman Flyer on the history of motordrome racing, how he came to build motorbikes, and why his vintage-looking saddles have leather flaps hanging off the sides. (Let’s just say the boys will be thankful).

Sportsman Flyer
Sportsman Flyer

Can you tell me a little bit about yourself and Sportsman Flyer?
Well, I have a back-round in welding and fabrication and have been working around equipment most of my life. I’ve been building and restoring cars since high school. I also enjoy sports, not the traditional team sports like baseball or football, but other sports like surfing, bike riding, flying, hunting and fishing. The Sportsman Flyer idea combines my interest in bicycles and the motor sports. Sportsman comes from the sporty nature of the bikes I build and Flyer refers to my time spent in aviation as a glider pilot.

How did you first get interested in building motorized bikes?
I have wanted a Whizzer, which is a vintage motorized bicycle, for years. Seems I could never find a decent deal on the right bike. A few years back my wife and I had been over surfing in Santa Cruz and we saw some guy ride by on a motorized bicycle. It wasn’t a Whizzer, but it was still pretty cool. That finally gave me the idea that I just needed the right bike and engine. I could combine the two and have my own motorized bicycle.

For someone who has never ridden a Sportsman Flyer, what do your customers say about the experience of riding their Sportsman?
They all say they find the experience pretty exhilarating. Especially the current bikes were building. It’s one thing to run around at over 50 mph on a motorcycle, but going that fast on a motorized bicycle is quite exciting.

Sportsman Flyer

How did you first find out about the motorbikes and motordromes of the 1920s?
I had seen a few vintage motorcycles and then the race bikes of the same era, the board track racers, at a couple vintage motorcycle shows and auctions in Monterey California. To me board track racers are just the coolest of the vintage motorcycles. Monterey has some of the best vintage motor sport events in the country and it’s a half hour from my house so I go every year.

It was a popular, and dangerous sport back then…
Yes, quite popular and very dangerous. The board tracks had huge banked corners. Speeds slowly crept up past 100 mph as engine designs advanced. Any sort of mechanical failure or collision could send the bikes flying off the track and into the crowds watching the race. Riders wore little in the way of safety gear. Crashing onto a wooden surface guaranteed at a minimum a serious case of splinters.

“I find sometimes that after all my hard work I try to convince myself that something looks good, then my brother or some friends will drop by and say ‘that looks lame.’ These guys are my harshest critics and I respect them for it.”

What’s your process for building bikes – strict pre-planning or making it up as you go?
I would say a bit of both. Because of my engineering background and drafting skills I prefer to hammer out the complicated details, off-sets, wheel base, rake and trail, on the computer first. Once I have a sound platform I build out the chassis and various components. From there I finish out the bike and stand back and take a good look. Does it look right? Are the proportions correct? How does it feel when I sit on it? Once I am comfortable with the overall look and feel I dress it out. Tires, grips, leather color on the seat, paint, etc.

As time goes on I continue to fine tune all my cad drawings. Some parts I manufacture have not changed in awhile, other parts, well I change every time I make another production run. You can have a perfectly engineered bike, but if it doesn’t look and feel right, what have you accomplished? I find sometimes that after all my hard work I try to convince myself that something looks good, then my brother or some friends will drop by and say ‘that looks lame.’ These guys are my harshest critics and I respect them for it.

Sportsman Flyer

“Our top of the line model, will cruise comfortably at 50 mph. Geared for top speed? Maybe past 65. You can go a long way on a gallon of gas. 50 – 60 miles.”
– pat dolan

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Yes, you too can now own a miniature Yankee Stadium for only $115,000. By the way, Mickey Mantle made $75,000 in 1961. Roger Maris made $42,000 in that same year. Or a combined salary of $117,000 for both Yankee sluggers.

1/8 Scale 1961 Yankee Stadium :: Hammacher Schlemmer (1)
1/8 Scale 1961 Yankee Stadium :: Hammacher Schlemmer (2)

1/8 SCALE STAY PUFT MARSHMALLOW MAN NOT INCLUDED 

1/8 Scale 1961 Yankee Stadium :: Hammacher Schlemmer (3)

“The field dimensions faithfully replicate the home run boundaries that faced Roger Maris and Mickey Mantle during their epic race to break ‘The Babe’s’ home run record in 1961, complete with the short, 295′ porch in right field and the nearly unapproachable 466′ centerfield wall.”

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Exclusive Superskates from UK’s size? Originally released in 1989.

Adidas Originals Superskate - size? (1)

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Adidas Originals Superskate - size? (2)

“Released in 1989, the Superskate was inspired by basketball shoes of that time, but was purposefully designed as the start of the brand’s skateboarding path.”

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