Interview with photographer Patrick Daly

patrick-daly

Revealing art from Nick Veasey. I wonder, does Nick glow in the dark?

Nick Veasey :: X-Ray Photos (1)

Nick Veasey :: X-Ray Photos (2)

Nick Veasey :: X-Ray Photos (3)

Nick Veasey :: X-Ray Photos (4)
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Pat Dolan of Sportsman Flyer on the history of motordrome racing, how he came to build motorbikes, and why his vintage-looking saddles have leather flaps hanging off the sides. (Let’s just say the boys will be thankful).

Sportsman Flyer
Sportsman Flyer

Can you tell me a little bit about yourself and Sportsman Flyer?
Well, I have a back-round in welding and fabrication and have been working around equipment most of my life. I’ve been building and restoring cars since high school. I also enjoy sports, not the traditional team sports like baseball or football, but other sports like surfing, bike riding, flying, hunting and fishing. The Sportsman Flyer idea combines my interest in bicycles and the motor sports. Sportsman comes from the sporty nature of the bikes I build and Flyer refers to my time spent in aviation as a glider pilot.

How did you first get interested in building motorized bikes?
I have wanted a Whizzer, which is a vintage motorized bicycle, for years. Seems I could never find a decent deal on the right bike. A few years back my wife and I had been over surfing in Santa Cruz and we saw some guy ride by on a motorized bicycle. It wasn’t a Whizzer, but it was still pretty cool. That finally gave me the idea that I just needed the right bike and engine. I could combine the two and have my own motorized bicycle.

For someone who has never ridden a Sportsman Flyer, what do your customers say about the experience of riding their Sportsman?
They all say they find the experience pretty exhilarating. Especially the current bikes were building. It’s one thing to run around at over 50 mph on a motorcycle, but going that fast on a motorized bicycle is quite exciting.

Sportsman Flyer

How did you first find out about the motorbikes and motordromes of the 1920s?
I had seen a few vintage motorcycles and then the race bikes of the same era, the board track racers, at a couple vintage motorcycle shows and auctions in Monterey California. To me board track racers are just the coolest of the vintage motorcycles. Monterey has some of the best vintage motor sport events in the country and it’s a half hour from my house so I go every year.

It was a popular, and dangerous sport back then…
Yes, quite popular and very dangerous. The board tracks had huge banked corners. Speeds slowly crept up past 100 mph as engine designs advanced. Any sort of mechanical failure or collision could send the bikes flying off the track and into the crowds watching the race. Riders wore little in the way of safety gear. Crashing onto a wooden surface guaranteed at a minimum a serious case of splinters.

“I find sometimes that after all my hard work I try to convince myself that something looks good, then my brother or some friends will drop by and say ‘that looks lame.’ These guys are my harshest critics and I respect them for it.”

What’s your process for building bikes – strict pre-planning or making it up as you go?
I would say a bit of both. Because of my engineering background and drafting skills I prefer to hammer out the complicated details, off-sets, wheel base, rake and trail, on the computer first. Once I have a sound platform I build out the chassis and various components. From there I finish out the bike and stand back and take a good look. Does it look right? Are the proportions correct? How does it feel when I sit on it? Once I am comfortable with the overall look and feel I dress it out. Tires, grips, leather color on the seat, paint, etc.

As time goes on I continue to fine tune all my cad drawings. Some parts I manufacture have not changed in awhile, other parts, well I change every time I make another production run. You can have a perfectly engineered bike, but if it doesn’t look and feel right, what have you accomplished? I find sometimes that after all my hard work I try to convince myself that something looks good, then my brother or some friends will drop by and say ‘that looks lame.’ These guys are my harshest critics and I respect them for it.

Sportsman Flyer

“Our top of the line model, will cruise comfortably at 50 mph. Geared for top speed? Maybe past 65. You can go a long way on a gallon of gas. 50 – 60 miles.”
– pat dolan

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Yes, you too can now own a miniature Yankee Stadium for only $115,000. By the way, Mickey Mantle made $75,000 in 1961. Roger Maris made $42,000 in that same year. Or a combined salary of $117,000 for both Yankee sluggers.

1/8 Scale 1961 Yankee Stadium :: Hammacher Schlemmer (1)
1/8 Scale 1961 Yankee Stadium :: Hammacher Schlemmer (2)

1/8 SCALE STAY PUFT MARSHMALLOW MAN NOT INCLUDED 

1/8 Scale 1961 Yankee Stadium :: Hammacher Schlemmer (3)

“The field dimensions faithfully replicate the home run boundaries that faced Roger Maris and Mickey Mantle during their epic race to break ‘The Babe’s’ home run record in 1961, complete with the short, 295′ porch in right field and the nearly unapproachable 466′ centerfield wall.”

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Exclusive Superskates from UK’s size? Originally released in 1989.

Adidas Originals Superskate - size? (1)

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Adidas Originals Superskate - size? (2)

“Released in 1989, the Superskate was inspired by basketball shoes of that time, but was purposefully designed as the start of the brand’s skateboarding path.”

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The Toleman TG184-2 was raced by Senna during his first year of Formula 1 in 1984.

Senna's 1984 Toleman TG-184-2 :: Silverstone Auctions (1)
Senna's 1984 Toleman TG-184-2 :: Silverstone Auctions (2)
Senna's 1984 Toleman TG-184-2 :: Silverstone Auctions (3)

“This chassis was piloted by Senna in the 1984 Monaco Grand Prix where the Brazilian driver announced himself on the world stage in spectacular fashion by finishing first on the road, but classified second to Alain Prost after the race was stopped on lap 32 due to torrential rain. Had the race continued, Senna would have scored Toleman’s first ever victory in spectacular fashion.”
– about the Toleman TG-184-2

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João Paulo is on a mission to travel the world and show, “…classic bikes in poses that show the context of the city in the background.” He plans on releasing a book of these worldly bikes.

@marrakesh, morroco 

@Marrakesh, Morroco.

@firenze, italy 

@Firenze, Italy.

@bath, england 

@Bath, England

@géneve, switzerland 

@Géneve, Switzerland

@amsterdan, netherlands 

@Amsterdan, Netherlands.
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Handsome looking Masserati from Silverstone Auctions. Estimate (£): 26,000–30,000

1977 Maserati Merak SS :: Silverstone Auctions (1)

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1977 Maserati Merak SS :: Silverstone Auctions (2)
1977 Maserati Merak SS :: Silverstone Auctions (3)
1977 Maserati Merak SS :: Silverstone Auctions (4)
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May 29, 2014. It’s with great sadness that we learned that Ezra Caldwell has passed away. An amazing man who lived life to its fullest. Our heartfelt condolences to his wife Hillary, and all of his friends and family. He will be missed.
 
From an interview I did with Ezra back in May of 2012…
 
Former Vermonter Ezra Caldwell on his transformation from dance teacher to bike builder, his love of urban bushwacking in New York, and how he made cancer cry.

Ezra Caldwell

Fast Boy Cycles :: hardass
Fast Boy Cycles

“I try not to do things simply because I CAN, but because I think deep down that they’re beautiful.”
– ezra caldwell

Can you tell me a little bit about yourself?
I’m from Vermont.

Where in Vermont?
Putney. (Named after my dog).

First bike you ever owned?
A super cool Flandria five speed road bike with little kid sized 24″ wheels. It’s hanging in my shop now.

How did you get interested in building bikes?
I had a pretty good gig teaching dance for a bunch of years (?). I always used a bike to get around. Students started approaching me wanting to become commuters. I took it upon myself to use whatever money they could come up with to put them on an appropriate bike. Lots of scouring Ebay, and Craigslist…finding frames that seemed like a good starting point and then building from there. Word got out, and people were coming to me with more and more money, and I became a bit of a bike stylist (gag.) When I finally ran away screaming from the dance world (something I had meant to do for years), bike building just appeared as the obvious next thing to do. To have real control over the final bike, I felt like I had to be building the frame as well as choosing what to hang from it.

What skill sets did you have already when it in came to bike building? Which ones did you have to learn?
I had a pretty decent background in fabrication. Mostly wood working. My father was a woodworker, and I grew up making stuff in his shop. Later, as a teenager, I worked construction around southern Vermont in the summers. Somewhere in there, later on, I took a year off from dance and worked in a cabinet shop in NYC. I had NO experience with metal work, though (besides an elective jewelry class in college). So, the basics of working with machines and understanding joints and learning how to make fixtures that allow you to repeat operations accurately…this stuff was all natural. I had to learn how to braze, though. And had to learn a lot about bicycle design, and just how the bloody things go together. Still learning that stuff, really.

Fast Boy Cycles

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An illustrative tribute to racing car builder Carroll Shelby from Unlimited Velocity.

The Shelby Heritage Collection :: Unlimited Velocity

“You got to do things that you’re not sure that you can do. You got to stick your neck out, and just see if it’s possible to accomplish something that everybody says you can’t.
 
I’ve had more failures than I ever had successes in my lifetime, and some of the failures have been more fun than some of the successes.”
– carroll shelby
In Their Own Words – Carroll Shelby  

The Shelby Heritage Collection :: Unlimited Velocity (1)

The Shelby Heritage Collection :: Unlimited Velocity (2)

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The Shelby Heritage Collection :: Unlimited Velocity (3)

“It was fun to blow off a Porsche with a $3900 donkey [the 1965 Shelby GT350 Mustang].”
– carroll shelby

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Found this magazine at the Alameda Flea Market. Sea plane illustrated by legendary artist Geo Ham.

L'Hydravion A La Bouée :: Geo Ham

L'Hydravion A La Bouée :: Geo Ham
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Mind…completely blown.

+ Source: ‘Titanic’ – BBC Videographic :: By After the Flood
 
 

Coming in at groin-pull inducing 75 pounds, and 790 pages, this book contains 1,000 photos and every Yogi Berra truism known to man. (That section alone is 700 pages).

Major League Baseball OPUS (1)

Major League Baseball OPUS (2)

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Major League Baseball OPUS (3)

Major League Baseball OPUS (4)

“He hits from both sides of the plate. He’s amphibious.”
– yogi berra

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