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Old School Viscom: 20 Renderings in 20 Steps :: Jason White

By March 25, 2012Cars

Jason teaches at Detroit’s College for Creative Studies. He was kind enough to share his methodology on analog rendering technique. Well known, Jason says, before the computer age. I’m really happy there are people like Jason out there.

Old School Viscom: 20 Renderings in 20 Steps :: Jason White (1)

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“The irony is that many of these techniques are just as applicable in a digital format. The 20 step format turned out to be just the right number of steps to convey each process — not to many steps, not too few.”
– jason white

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Old School Viscom: 20 Renderings in 20 Steps :: Jason White (5)

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From Jason:

The concept behind Old School Viscom was to preserve analog rendering techniques that were not as well known in the computer age. The irony is that many of these techniques are just as applicable in a digital format. The 20 step format turned out to be just the right number of steps to convey each process — not to many steps, not too few. One trick that resonates with a lot of students is the spliced Canson technique, which occurs in the red Corvair demo and others. This technique can be applied in a digital environment using paths in Photoshop; the principle of blocking in fields of color remains the same. Other old school techniques I’ve explored include alcohol washes, layered markers, rendering stainless steel, and more recently, gouache painting. I actually have a show coming up Wednesday nite in Detroit, some of the pieces I sent you will be there.

About Jason:

Jason graduated from Detroit’s College for Creative Studies in 1999 with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Transportation Design. While at CCS, he was awarded internships at Chrysler Corporation and William M. Schmidt Associates. He worked as a designer at Ford Motor Company in Dearborn, Michigan from 1999 to 2006. His contributions there include the 2008 Ford Escape/Mercury Mariner interior and the 2007 Ford Super Duty instrument panel. After a three year stint at Hyundai in Ann Arbor, Michigan, Jason has returned to Ford as a contract designer. He has taught freshman transportation design courses at his alma mater since 2007. In 2010, Jason published his first book, the critically acclaimed Old School Viscom: 20 Renderings in 20 Steps.

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